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and he said i am terribly sorry. my name is steve and you if you want to report me. then he ran for the door. i felt bad for steve. i like steve. i chased after him to make sure he knew no hard feelings. every time i see steve in the hall i say hi, steve so he knows there are no hard feelings. only recently did it occur to me his name is probably not steve. smurfs so when i started this year, 2012, i was looking forward to two things. two steps that i believe would help us fundamentally transform our government into that kind of government or more closely representing -- resembling that kind of government our founding fathers envisioned for us. one of those events i knew whitaker most likely in june. probably toward the end of june. probably the last -- the last thursday of june. the other date that i recognized as potentially transform it of of our government, the other dates i recognized would probably have a positive impact on the development of our system of government is november 6th. and i would like to say at the outset i want to thank chief justice robert for preparing t
the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election that romney lost and we keep the strategy of footprint and europe would like to see what leadership. the reason i see most of the countries would seek greater involvement of the u.s., not all us paula mentioned. i wonder, a lot of reasons as you mentioned, david, the people in the united states are ready to take on that role. economic reasons from afghanistan and iraq are tired of it. the u.s. taking less of a leadership role that one day will the back and regret it is custom to the u.s. that meeting. >> and there was one over here. yes. >> thank you. -- >> name and affiliation, please. >> my name is my name is umbrella salÉ from afghanistan. immediately i have a small comment followed by a question. immediately after 9/11, the new normal west to kill and capture al qaeda taliban, bring them to justice, deny the space for mi
minutes. [applause] >> thank you so much and good morning, everyone, and welcome, steve. it's really, really a pleasure to have you here in this morning, and we're going to dive right in. i want to begin, first, by giving you credit for speaking to the world affairs could coun. i believe it wasn't only last year, but the year before when steve hadley challenged all of us to come up with a focus, a set of issues, in fact, that the councils across the united states should be honing in on. well, as you know, this year's conference is galvanized around a set of issues, u.s. national security, six topic issues for the president in 2013. and let me just recap those for you, because we want to drill down in these. the councils have selected u.s. economic competitiveness, u.s. education competing globally, the middle east, china, afghanistan/pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. so starting with that, looking at it strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? um, if not, what would y
, the color ran from the face, and he said, i'm sorry, my name is steve if you want to report me, and then he ran for the door. [laughter] i felt bad for steve. i liked steve. i chased after him to ensure he knew no hard feelings. every time i say hi steve in the hallway so he knows there's no hard feelings. his name is probably not steve. [laughter] so, you know, when i started this year, 2012, i was looking forward to two things, two steps i believed would help us fundamentally transform our government into that kind of government or something more closely representing, resemilling that government that our founding fathers end visionedded for us. one of the events, they would occur in june, probably for the end of jupe, probably the last of june, which i identified adds june 28th -- i was right. the other date i recognized as potentially transformative of our government, the other date that i recognize that i thought would probably have a positive impact op the development of our constitutional system of government was november 6th. i would just like to say at the outset that i want to than
for containment to push this away. those two ridings are not reasonable alternatives that steve has said remaining engaged with pakistan there is an alternative to it. but i would argue that having a focus simply on the bilateral relationship is something that has been a problem for us and what we need to do is break out of this if you will the sterile debate and look at the issues that are crosscutting with pakistan's relationship to india and that have to do with a sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned when the american focus becomes somewhat less the relationship through the counterterrorism and opens the door for the more creative ways of business, academic, a media that have really suffered in the last ten years. so i guess i come out to your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic if we can keep things on the rail which you know what will happen over the last ten years isn't an easy thing and it's like rolling down the side do would be and you don't know how for the region goes so keeping things on track it isn't ea
minority leader, you're leader in the senate, mitch mcconnell told my colleague steve moore, says he does not believe that is his mandate. >> look. as you know i'm a fierce advocate for tax reform for all the reasons we talked about earlier. competitiveness. america is falling behind in terms of our competentive position and one of the main reasons is our tax system is antiquated. it is inefficient. there are ways to fix it. every other country in the world by the way, oecd countries, have transformed, reformed, lower the rates. think about it. we haven't touched it since ronald reagan really. in 1986. bill clinton did raise the rate one point but we haven't done anything to touch our rate and reform our code. every other country, all of them have. taxes gone from 16% to 15%. you do business there. this flow of capital will follow countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is oppor
. this move to michelle ng obama's father's side of the family, michelle obama's and and this is steve johnson, the first lady's great-grandmother who traveled to four cities, she was a sharecropper's daughter born in 1879 and somewhere along the way she decided she did not want anything to do with the farming life and she was one of the first of michele obama's and sisters to set site on chicago in 1908. this is her husband who was a minister who also lived in chicago. this is the first lady's great great grandmother, and she arrived in illinois some time in the 1860s. the first lady describes herself as a south side girl but the family had no idea their roots in illinois go that far back. if you look at mary, you will understand why the family story says she was part cherokee. she obviously has a mixed lineage but i was never able to establish for sure whether that was true. this is the first lady's grandfather, a mislabeled slide, who left south carolina and arrive in chicago around 1931. this is millvinia, the owner of millvinia's brother. this is a photo, this is an amazing coat, there is
attack. during amazon book review of patriot history of the united states had met steve dougherty and arkansas businessman historian computer expert from evening shade. we first became a top to bottom review of sidney p. church history the united states and over time i discovered he's a wonderful co-author, so i asked him to help me with history of the modern world. he proved especially good in areas where it was the tennessee former intelligence officer in the army, he brought a new perspective to the cold war, especially the second volume we are working on now. as john mentioned, this is volume one deficit to 1945 and volume two will be out about this time next year, 1946 to president. i have to warn readers, such as those who see me speak before probably know me for a little more lighthearted insertion, but this is instead dominated by two unspeakably deadly wars sandwiched around a nearly worldwide depression and characterized by such villains as miscellany, stallman and hitler. i don't even think joe biden cannot get that material. while we have some sidebar section, one of m
a lot more of that. >> okay. steve, do you have anything to add to that? >> i will go quickly. my name is anna from the dallas-fort worth world affairs council. i teach seniors, so i have been facebooking for the conference and the ask questions and i answer back and i've already scanned my notes. the point is they want to know for this -- right now because they are on line with the -- should they be optimistic? they're very scared, the class of 2013. what can i pass on to them about economic competitiveness and they should be optimistic or worried? >> great question from the seniors. okay, steve. slingbox >> notwithstanding everything i said before -- [laughter] i'm actually optimistic. i'm optimistic because heidi ticked off a number of these before in a slightly different context. we have the most flexible economy in the world. we have this incredibly diverse labor force and a diverse group of people in this country that come here because the opportunity. there aren't that many people that leave america to go all these other places that we worry about being more competitive than we
, and there was this bit of time where you and christopher and steve were collecting these pieces from the past 10 or 12 years. and, of course, would've been 1600 bits. >> far too much. >> and he was completely agnostic about what we could get rid of our what we could complete, and you were less to spend i hated seeing all those pieces being thrown out. it was fine with him. >> it's astonishing to look back on the collection and think about the breadth of subjects he was interested in, and just how wide-ranging his work was. >> he would write, for example, for "vanity fair" he wrote the entire text to the "vanity fair" hollywood book not knowing who have these stars were until he read their bios. you would write about starlets, sit down at the last minute and then he would write a long essay on philip morgan or the chesterton that was mentioned which he wrote in the icu of the m.d. anderson hospital center. >> don't forget -- >> extraordinary range, or could be peachy white house or james bond. or hegel or marx. >> we should, not to be morbid, but we should talk about his courage, and the fact that his
to immigration. >> i was an immigration lawyer for 15 years, so as a conservative voice i understand what steve is saying, but i think we have to realize as republican party that we're never going to be a majority party if we don't figure out a way to reach to the hispanic, to reach the hispanic community. so we have defined what i call, and i been talking about this for two years but where to find a conservative consensus on immigration. we have to figure out how steve and i are going to sit and agree on a bill, and people at this table that will actually do something about a broken immigration system. one of the biggest things can service talk about often is that we want to fix a broken government. well, if you know anything about immigration law, the immigration system is absolutely broken in the united states. we need to get away that people can come to the united states to a legal system. we have to do something about border protection, i'm a big fan doing something with e-verify. all those things we have to do, but at the same time we have to forget what we pashtun we can't keep punting t
to love and em pa think that extends all boundaries. steve shinekin. [applause] the race to build and steal the world's most dangerous weapon. published by flash point, an imprint of roaring book press. a rivetting thriller of a book that tells the birth of a new age. to all these writers, thank you. thank you for your work. and thank you for what it will mean to young readers in our nation. this year's national award for young people literature goes to william alexander. ♪ [applause] ♪ >> we are proof that alternate universe exists. there has to be endanger takes the film. there's one a little further away. it was written bay author, i think it won it both times. there's -- and just another step sideways where we're standing "out of reach" it has to take it home for creating such substance out a wrenching absence. and this moment just a little step away from we're are. we're also being reminded of the devastating importance of narrative in "never fall down" and if we exclude that set of earth's already destroyed by the bomb, and instead consider the set that survives to the n
steve moore last week he does not believe that's his mandate. >> uh-huh, well, look, as you know, i'm a fierce advocate for tax reform and competitiveness, and america is falling behind because our tax system is antiquated and inefficient. there are ways to fix it. every other develop country+n0 transformed, reformed, lowered rates -- >> [inaudible] >> we have not touched it since reagan, really, but we have done kneeing to touch the rate or reform the code. all of them have. 16.5% to 15.5% which you are aware of because you do business there. the flow and investment and people follow countries that have a more competitive environment, and taxes is one of them. reform the tax code. when you do that, you get more revenue. guaranteed almost. i mean, it's, again, it's as i said earlier, there's opportunities here, and this is an opportunity for us as a country, and as you look at the budget analysis, joint tax committee analysis of what tax reform could be in terms of economic and growth, i mean, all of them will lead to more growth whether it's corporate tax reform or individual tax r
for an adjective that captured this gentleman and i came up with this one, electric, steve clemens who is with the atlantic now and has been a great source here. of course the newseum shelby coffey who's been a key architect of this event. this year we are doing something different. we welcome a new partnership in the harvard institute of politics who've carried of the elections in side of the program track and so i would like to extend a sincere thanks to the director of the harvard institute of politics. and now i would like to thank our important presenting underwriters have made this event possible, and they are altria, bank of america, comcast, exxonmobil, thompson reuters and united technologies and the supporting underwriters of the american federation of teachers and the center for auto quality, and then for drinks tonight well-deserved drinks at the reception, the underwriter is google. finally if you're housekeeping notes. we are going to run the program straight through without breaks so you can infer what that means. please, silence your cell phone and this is just your rin
in with your questions with steve latourette, a member of the appropriations committee. and jason beck who governs the house roll call. "washington journal" is live on c-span everyday at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you're watching c-span2 for politics and public affairs weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. watch key public policy events on weeknights and every weekend, the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our websites. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> more on how members of congress approach the fiscal cliff and expiring tax breaks and automatic spending cuts. "the wall street journal"'s eeo counsel annual meeting hosted senator joseph lieberman and former senators trent lott and james fassett. this little as an hour. >> they have the most expensive election in american history. both candidates have plenty of time to make their policy preference is well-known. then the president at the white house, the republicans have a house, no one really controlled the senate. so here we are. the questi
joins steve israel to introduce a new house democrat, new house democrats who were elected this month. these members will take office in january, and c-span is scheduled to cover this briefing live at 2 eastern right after the house gavels out. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president through a short video. let president obama know what's the most important issue he should consider in 2013 for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grades 6-12, and the deadline is january 18, 2013. go online to studentcam.org. >> what i like about c pan's coverage is -- c-span's coverage is it's in depth. often times you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch "the communicators," i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that you do at the national press club where there are policy leaders speaking, i find those useful. >> howard woolley watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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